Category: S works tarmac 2021

I have to choose the best race bike of all time? One is the simple ubiquity of the brand. It turns a lot of people off—kinda like the Yankees. I get it. But those discussions have nothing to do with quality and performance.

The E5 involved a carbon top half bonded to an aluminum lower, in an attempt to combine the stiffness of aluminum with the weight savings and compliance of carbon.

So, we were dipping a toe in the water of carbon. The E5 was very stiff, but it would feel harsh by modern standards. It had an aluminum backbone, after all. And nothing about its straight-gauge head tube inspires confidence within a few years, tapered head tubes would become more popular for their improved stiffness and handling. Still, bythe E5 was already starting to define the Tarmac look, with that arched cobra of a top tube that would remain a part of the Tarmac design until Specialized had signed on as the bike supplier for Team Quick-Step ahead of the season.

It was also the first full-carbon Tarmac. But when Boonen got his first SL, he shared feedback that changed not only the next generation of Tarmac but how Specialized approached frame design and testing overall. Find 52 weeks of tips and motivation, with space to fill in your mileage and favorite routes, with the Bicycling Training Journal.

s works tarmac 2021

And he was feeling the rear wheel sort of disconnect from the bike. Specialized discovered that, while Tarmac had good overall torsional stiffness—a broad measurement of how much the entire frame twists as a single unit, front to back—that global number masked some local issues. So engineers built different tests until they finally found one that could recreate it hence the name Test 14 for the machine that focuses on lateral flex of the rear stays.

As a result, they redesigned the rear stays and began testing stiffness at different spots throughout the frame. In that way, Specialized began making sure that what it measured in the lab reflected how the bike would perform under the localized loads of real-world racing. Specialized Carbon Gets Dialed. SL2 was such a massive leap forward that Specialized stuck with it for seven years.

The SL3 and SL4 generations were simply iterations on that platform, with tweaks made to weight and stiffness. Rider First is an attempt to deliver the same ride quality for every rider, through different stiffness targets for each frame size. Historically, the primary difference between frame sizes was geometry.

Top 5 - 2020 Road Bikes

Each frame had the same tubes in the same places, just cut longer or shorter. As carbon engineering advanced, manufacturers began to introduce size-specific layups and shapes, but that was in order to achieve the same stiffness targets at each size.Post by okimy on Thu Jul 11, pm.

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2021 Giant TCR Advanced SL Disc first-ride review: An aero evolution

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s works tarmac 2021

Quick links. Forum rules. Post by okimy on Thu Jul 11, pm One of the employees at my LBS told me when asking him about the new Cannondale SupersixEvo that he'd wait about buying a new bike. Apparently there is a new Specialized Tarmac coming this fall.

Has anyone heard something similar or does anyone know something about this rumor? Post by Jhomewood on Thu Jul 11, pm The only thing i can imagine is a rolling update to run the cables internally on the current frame to keep up with the Joneses.However, the family of carbon fiber frames has also gone on a diet, gains a newly refined geometry, and — of course — has room for bigger tires, all while still retaining its superb stiffness and composed ride quality.

In a move that will surprise precisely no one — if only because we saw the new TCR at races months ago — the new TCR has been reshaped with aerodynamic efficiency in mind. Note the rather flattish-backed profiles on the head tube and down tube, for example. For example, Giant is sticking with separate stems and handlebars instead of following the herd and using a one-piece front end. Although modest aero profiles are featured on the tops of some of the handlebars — depending on model — and the headset spacers are profiled to match the head tube, the more traditional two-piece layout still affords more adjustability and customization in a key area.

Assuming the numbers hold true, that means those figures are more likely to be experienced by actual riders on a real road. Also interesting is that while Giant admits to only having tested the disc-brake version of the TCR in the wind tunnel, its computational fluid dynamics simulations suggest that the rim-brake models are actually slightly less efficient. When it comes to going fast, numerous studies have proven that aerodynamic efficiency is usually the most important factor.

Even better, Giant says the new bike has actually improved in both areas. The company even makes its own pre-preg sheets instead of purchasing it elsewhere — using resins that are blended in-house — and that level of control affords some additional freedom in how the frames are made.

Fast, Focused, Efficient

For the latest TCR Advanced SL, the company has instituted a few rather interesting-sounding manufacturing innovations. The down tube is still extremely wide like the previous version, but the shape is less overtly rectangular than before. Individual pieces of those pre-preg sheets are now cut by laser instead of the usual hydraulic press and steel blades for smaller and lighter pieces, too, and of the or so pieces that are typically used in a single frame and fork, Giant says about of them are now put into place by robots for greater precision before the whole assembly is clamped in a mold and baked.

Conversely, certain sections of the TCR Advanced SL frames are made with fewer, but bigger, plies that prioritize longer continuous fiber runs for more efficient and, thus, lighter use of material. Claimed weight for a medium frame with full-length integrated seatmast but without the head and paint is now just grams, with the matching fork adding another grams. How slight, you might wonder? According to Giant, the old bike posted a bottom bracket deflection of The new fork has dropped a single gram relative to the previous one, but torsional stiffness has supposedly gone up, which should at least theoretically translate to more predictable handling, especially on the disc-brake models.

According to Giant, these in-house stiffness figures were generated using the Tour Magazine protocol. Photo: Giant Bicycle. While the previous TCR Advanced SL Disc was already impressively light, the new one manages to shave a remarkable amount of mass when viewed from a percentage standpoint.

Bottom bracket drop has increased by 2 mm across the six-size range. Stack and reach have also been adjusted for a more even progression as you move through the sizes, and smaller sizes get slightly steeper seat tube angles. Interestingly, the small size specifically gets a slightly slacker head tube angle, too. The bigger stock tire size has the side effect of increasing trail a bit, and wheelbase measurements have grown across the board as well. Chainstay length remains a tidy mm, indicating that virtually all of that wheelbase increase occurs up front.

In order to compensate for [larger tire sizes], we lowered the bottom bracket, and in order to get enough tire clearance at the fork, we increased the fork length by 2 mm, which increases the trail and helps for more stability.Toggle navigation.

Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL6 Disc review

Categories Discussions Sign in. July edited July in Road buying advice. Hi, I'm hoping someone in the industry may be able to advise here. I'm seriously considering purchasing an S-Works Tarmac. My questions is, I've heard new models may be released in August. Does anyone 'know' if these will be updates to the existing models or completely new designs? I know the SL6 was released 3 years ago, and not sure if Specialized will create a new bike.

I'd hate to put a load of cash down on a high end bike only to find out 1 month later a 'new' version has come out! I would have thought that if there was a new one coming out, they would be riding them in the TdF like EF Education did at the Dauphine, but Bora and Quickstep are on the current model from the looks of things. July Enjoy the purchase and enjoy in good health.

Occasionally you get a change in frame design as the last major iteration with an additional update of the type of carbon used. And God created the bicycle, so that man could use it as a means for work and to help him negotiate life's complicated journey. Oh, I've seen the Roubaix but not anything else. Some of the other Tarmac models are out of stock in most sizes.

I visited a local Specialized dealer and they said the current Tarmacs that are out of stock won't be back in stock due to the new models coming out in August, but they wouldn't say anything more.

They may have been making that up though and the current ones I can find are the models! Specialized only recently refreshed the tarmac and venge models, so will be a couple of years before the next version comes out. So next years model will have the same frame but perhaps with slightly different components. Thanks guys, yup, thats made me feel better Post some pics and share the joy. Sign In or Register to comment.Photo by Cameron Baird. New airfoil sections using strategically placed truncated ellipse tubing around the headtube, downtube and seattube make the new TCR significantly more aerodynamic than the previous generation.

Giant says it focused on three key performance factors when designing the revamped TCR, which comes in six frame sizes XS-XL : class-leading efficiency, advanced aerodynamics, and total control. Those are buzzwords to be sure, but if you believe even some of the data presented by Giant at launch, this is certainly a compelling new road racing weapon. You can see a Giant-provided comparative chart on stiffness to weight below.

The Giant TCR is also claimed to perform solidly in the aerodynamic department, producing the most quantifiable gains compared to the previous generation TCR. Giant says that every tube shape was analyzed, engineered and tested to create an overall structure with significantly lower drag at a wider range of yaw angles. Aero development and testing were conducted at the GST wind tunnel in Germany with a proprietary dynamic mannequin to best replicate real-world racing conditions by factoring in the drag of a rider and bike together.

Tests also showed the new TCR to be more aerodynamic than the previous generation, saving 34 seconds over 40km at watts. The control aspect of the equation includes updated disc-brake integration and use of new composite Giant WheelSystems that offer greater stability in crosswinds. Yes, they also still make a rim brake option for those still holding out on the superior stopping technology. The wheels also feature Dynamic Balanced Lacing DBL and low-friction hubs for better efficiency and reduced rolling resistance.

Both the Fleet SLR and Fleet SL have a wide shape with a short nose and ergonomic cutout for enhanced comfort and support, plus a side curve that provides added freedom of motion. Each is available in either disc brake or rim brake options, making it six series in all. The TCR will be available starting May 5, The new TCR range comes in six different series at a variety of price levels.

Due to significant coronavirus-driven life changes for your author—including having two small children at home full-time—testing on the new TCR Advanced SL 0 Disc has yet to commence. But RoadBikeReview did get the bike unboxed, cut the seatmast, and got it built up.

After snipping 8cm off the seatmast to reach my desired 82cm saddle height, the XL sized test bike weighed an impressive This weight was with the stock 25mm tubeless tires and no sealant.

Figure when we swap on our preferred 28mm tires and pour in some sealant that weight will bump past pounds, still an impressive weight given the frame size. Stay tuned to RoadBikeReview for a full review. An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since Post by Shrike on Mon Oct 21, am. Post by petromyzon on Mon Oct 21, am. Post by Ritxis on Mon Oct 21, am. Post by romanmoser on Mon Oct 21, pm.

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Quick links.Post by okimy on Thu Jul 11, pm.

Specialized S-Works Tarmac Disc

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s works tarmac 2021

Quick links. Forum rules. Post by okimy on Thu Jul 11, pm One of the employees at my LBS told me when asking him about the new Cannondale SupersixEvo that he'd wait about buying a new bike. Apparently there is a new Specialized Tarmac coming this fall. Has anyone heard something similar or does anyone know something about this rumor? Post by Jhomewood on Thu Jul 11, pm The only thing i can imagine is a rolling update to run the cables internally on the current frame to keep up with the Joneses.


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